Disabled accessibility

…as opposed to accessibility for disabled.

Every day I bump into somewhere that is inaccessible, maybe not to me but then to someone else with a different kind of disability. when I say inaccessible I am not only talking about physical structures like buildings or transport or places like bathrooms. There are many things that are inaccessible as well. It might as well be a website like this one – and to be quite honest, I could be pointing my finger at myself here. I have never explored how my blog is accessible to the blind, for instance. And it could be any other sort of communicative device or medium that most of us take for granted.

Lack of access is not in and of itself discriminatory. I am one of those who have a certain level of understanding when it comes to e.g. historical buildings. I live in a city where they abound and I love living here despite the fact that there are places that I will never be able to visit. But at the same time, to my great delight, I am seeing more and more of them being retrofitted so they are accessible. And to a great extend I also have some compassion for how it is not always possible. There is a very small renaissance royal castle here that would be virtually destroyed if elevators were installed.

I am not so radical that I will demand everywhere completely accessible, to me that is a pipe dream. What really does make my bristles stand on end, though, is when I see how new building designs are made in a fashion where disabled people are forced to use a ‘special’ entrance because they didn’t think accessibility into the design to begin with. I am sure they often do it for aesthetic reasons, but I have yet to see an architect leave out the stairs for those reasons. Most of the time accessibility seems more like an afterthought which means that an elevator or some hideous ramp is ‘glued’ to the backside of the building without being part of the original design. So not only is it mismatched with that sort of thing, it also doesn’t matters that it might take ridiculously long time for the disabled to get into wherever it is they are going. Personally have I seen some pretty funky places when I have gone to some venue, museum or whatever, living quarters, offices, storage rooms, you name it.

So today when I ran across one of these ‘special’ entrances to a fairly new building, I couldn’t help thinking about a relic from my childhood. Growing up in a city where most of the residential buildings are from late 19th and early 20th century, I used to regularly encounter signs at the foot of wide swooping staircases that read something like this:

“Servants, delivery men and children must use the back entrance”

No ‘please’. It was obviously not necessary to be polite to such groups of sub-humans. These entrances would in most cases lead directly into the kitchen that in those days had a purely utilitarian purpose making it crammed and dark and smelly. And they were used for carrying all kinds of stuff up and down from the apartments, like garbage, coal and human waste (before the water closet was invented) I know it was not just in Copenhagen that this sort of signage could be seen, there is a strong tradition in the western world for having undesirables be out of sight unless they were needed. Not to mention all the ones that were not even allowed into our structures.

Making unnecessary special entrances for the disabled is no different than making delivery boys and servants use the back entrance. These sorts of entrances send mixed messages to the community at large. On the one hand are they show the proprietors as being thoughtful of the disabled people who want to use their establishments. On the other hand they are sending a message to the disabled community that even though they need not feel like they aren’t welcome they are not truly valued on equal terms and that their participation is more of an addendum than something that was thought of from the start. And by not being valued as participants we are not really valued as individuals with equal rights.

In some ways this sort of attitude is more insidious than those places both physical and virtual, where there is no accessibility at all. The completely inaccessible places are easily recognized as being discriminatory where these sorts of places are practicing a much more subtle and surreptitious kind of discrimination, one that most people will not even recognize or think about.

After I had passed the place with the hideous elevator addition I knew I would write this blog post. But another project kept nagging me. I felt inspired by the “Servants, delivery men and children must use the back entrance” sign of my childhood. And I thought to myself, why not make a “No disability access” sign that we can put up in those places where we are barred entry for whatever reason? Why not create a universally recognized sign that made it obvious to everybody that we are not welcome?

And immediately I knew what it should look like. Thanks to pictograms people worldwide have a common language for these kinds of things. So I set to it and created my image. As you can see it is pretty simple and I have found no other sign like it anywhere, so I have registered it under a ‘Creative Commons’ license which means that anybody can use it if they wish to.

Disabled, no entry copy

Once I have the time I will have a bunch of stickers made with the image so I can put them up wherever I feel the need for it. So if you want some drop me a note and I will get a bigger order. Otherwise you can always see the pictures I take of the places I will honor with this beautiful pictogram.

Going shopping

So I went to my local supermarket today and it is not just any odd convenience store. No it happens to be the biggest supermarket chain in Denmark, NETTO, which happens to be owned by the wealthiest company in the country, Maersk, which also happens to be the largest shipping company in the world. A company that apparently is too poor to accommodate their disabled customers in a decent and worthy fashion.

I just wanted to buy some groceries and what do I see to my dismay – the one – yes ONE – parking space they have at their store has been invaded. This time not by any of the usual suspects; shopping carts, bicycles, strollers or unauthorized vehicles. No, as a celebration of the coming spring the store has decided to let it be invaded by a floral display. A floral display of all things!

This is the parking space for disabled
This is the parking space for disabled

Not as in a sudden exclamation of peace, love and happiness – after all we’re talking about a commercial outfit that is not necessarily known for their sense of aesthetics. So they are exhibiting the pretty flowers that they are trying to sell at inflated prices to their customers.

What adds insult to injury is that there are about 50 non-disabled parking spaces, most of them completely empty all around this display of cheerfulness. Spaces that could easily have been converted into flower stands if they had so chosen. But that would have meant that the entrance to the door would not have been blocked – and who in their right mind want to see where to enter the store they are going to?Yes, the floral arrangement was in fact so large that it not only blocked the entire disabled parking space as well as the sign for it (God forbid anybody was going to see it and complain) it also blocked the entire entrance to the store.

Now, in their own understanding they did afford some replacement parking. On my way out I saw one of those ‘the floor is wet’ sandwich signs. [check out the pictures] With a tiny little piece of paper saying ‘handic  ap  space’ (yes, it’s true, the paper was so small that they found it wise to divide the word up into ‘handic’ and ‘ap’) This sign was conveniently placed up against some of the flowers in the back and not even close to any of the alternative parking spaces.

Notice the disabled parking sign behind all the shelves
Notice the disabled parking sign behind all the shelves

Ok, I am no idiot, I am certain the little sign had sat close to one of the other parking spaces. But that only makes it even more moronic. First of all, who but the most goodie-goodie old ladies are going to respect such an amateurish attempt at reserving a parking space for others. And secondly, and by far worse, those spaces are not wide enough for anybody with a wheelchair to get out of their vehicle. I own a van with a lift on the side and there is no way in hell I can get out if I try to squeeze into one of those.

So NETTO and Maersk, You better do better. I have decided to spend the next few weekday afternoons at your store, parked right in the driveway that goes by that parking space so your other customers will have a hard time getting past me. I plan on arriving around 3.30 when traffic really picks up and I can easily spent a good 1½ hour browsing your store and end up buying a pack of chewing gum – if I can find one cheap enough.

The 'new' type of signage, hidden away amongst the pretty flowers
The ‘new’ type of signage, hidden away amongst the pretty flowers